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Rescue Central

News

News

Send us your blog, news or related articles that you would like to share with others

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Thank You for Garth

Posted on May 22, 2013 at 4:10 AM

Thanks for a lovely friend six months on from getting him. He is very active and keeps us very busy but we love it, cheers.

John Black.



News From the Holloway Family

Posted on March 26, 2013 at 4:40 AM

Hi everyone at Aspen Valley. I thought it time to give you an update on Scuttle, now Jack and Scraggy now Jamie. We have had Jack two years now and he has come along in leaps and bounds. He seemed to be somewhat depressed when we collected him, his eyes were vacant and nothing seemed to get him going, so we were very worried. His tail looked like a little pigs tail and he would not unfurl it, however we came back to Aspen to see a dog, but that did`nt work out and just as we were going in came a tiny little scraggy dog, and instantly clicked into place with all three of us, and this was a year ago. Well it was a long wait and others were very interested in him so we were very relieved when we could take him home were he met Jack again, and off they went like two lost brothers and neither of them has looked back since. Jack straight tale, and Jamie now trimmed are just meant to be together along with two rescued cats one of which has only three legs, and all four are like a little family. They go for a long walk every day with husband Ian and come back like --- well I will show you Jamie, sorry unable to show you the dogs as I am unable to find an upload point, I will send you an email with the pictures on, I can do it that way. Anyway Jamie comes home full of mud and anything else he can find, so it is to the shower most days.

Well the point of this email is to let you know they are both fine and well, very happy and we love them to bits, as they love us. We will try to get over one day so you can see them yourselves, I think you will be very happy with them as well as us.

Thank you for our dogs,

Marian and Ian.

The Pet warehouse of Oswaldtwistle supporting stray dogs

Posted on March 13, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Many thanks to all the staff at The Pet Warehouse, Oswaldtwistle.

They are kindly supporting all dogs rehomed and giving every new owner adopting a stray dog from Aspen Valley, a free 15kg bag of chicken & rice dry food and bag of treats.

The new owner can collect these in store on proof of ownership of the dog, and staff will gladly provide these free of charge.

The affects of Mange

Posted on February 16, 2013 at 6:15 PM

This is peaches (16/2/13)

Some common pet diseases can prove notoriously stubborn and expensive to fix, taking weeks or even months to see any improvement.

A classic example is mange – infestation of your pet’s skin by tiny mites resulting in hair loss and itching; but not all mites behave in the same way, with individual species of mite bestowing their own unique ill effects on their poor victims.

The two main types of mange mite affecting dogs are sarcoptic (scabies) and demodectic (from the genus Demodex), with others such as ear mites and seasonal harvest mites usually causing less severe problems.

Sarcoptic mange is caused by a highly contagious mite spending its whole life cycle burrowed in the outer layers of skin, giving rise to intense itching, which quickly leads to raw, painful lesions caused by self-inflicted scratching and chewing – especially at the ear flaps and elbows.

Scabies is the mange we can catch from dogs by direct contact and is also spread via grooming and infected bedding. Foxes are significant sources of sarcoptic mange too, with recent rises in urban fox populations often blamed for nasty outbreaks.

Unlike sarcoptic mange, demodectic mange behaves very differently, living within the hair follicles of your dog and very rarely spreading to us or other dogs (apart from during a dog’s first few days of life, transferring from mum to pup via the muzzle).

Dogs with healthy immune systems rarely succumb to Demodex, as they quickly and efficiently contain the parasite, preventing multiplication and disease. However, the minority of dogs with much weaker defence systems aren’t able to beat these mites, so lesions develop and disease spreads locally to the face and forelimbs or more widely across the body.

Cases of Demodex usually resolve when the dog’s immune system kicks in at about a year old. But without immune control, disease can become very generalised and even life-threatening, with characteristic hair loss, skin reddening and severe secondary bacterial infections.

Most mite infestations can be diagnosed by direct identification under the microscope (pictured) after skin scrapes or hair plucks. However, these don’t always reveal the offending creatures, so it’s not uncommon for your vet to start treatment before any positive ID.

These days, new drugs, anti-parasitic shampoos, dips and spot-on treatments usually mean quicker response times, but multiple treatments taking up to six months are often necessary. As with all diseases, the quicker you visit your vet, the more likely mange can be dealt with effectively.

 


The affects of Mange

Posted on February 16, 2013 at 6:15 PM

This is peaches (16/2/13)

Some common pet diseases can prove notoriously stubborn and expensive to fix, taking weeks or even months to see any improvement.

A classic example is mange – infestation of your pet’s skin by tiny mites resulting in hair loss and itching; but not all mites behave in the same way, with individual species of mite bestowing their own unique ill effects on their poor victims.

The two main types of mange mite affecting dogs are sarcoptic (scabies) and demodectic (from the genus Demodex), with others such as ear mites and seasonal harvest mites usually causing less severe problems.

Sarcoptic mange is caused by a highly contagious mite spending its whole life cycle burrowed in the outer layers of skin, giving rise to intense itching, which quickly leads to raw, painful lesions caused by self-inflicted scratching and chewing – especially at the ear flaps and elbows.

Scabies is the mange we can catch from dogs by direct contact and is also spread via grooming and infected bedding. Foxes are significant sources of sarcoptic mange too, with recent rises in urban fox populations often blamed for nasty outbreaks.

Unlike sarcoptic mange, demodectic mange behaves very differently, living within the hair follicles of your dog and very rarely spreading to us or other dogs (apart from during a dog’s first few days of life, transferring from mum to pup via the muzzle).

Dogs with healthy immune systems rarely succumb to Demodex, as they quickly and efficiently contain the parasite, preventing multiplication and disease. However, the minority of dogs with much weaker defence systems aren’t able to beat these mites, so lesions develop and disease spreads locally to the face and forelimbs or more widely across the body.

Cases of Demodex usually resolve when the dog’s immune system kicks in at about a year old. But without immune control, disease can become very generalised and even life-threatening, with characteristic hair loss, skin reddening and severe secondary bacterial infections.

Most mite infestations can be diagnosed by direct identification under the microscope (pictured) after skin scrapes or hair plucks. However, these don’t always reveal the offending creatures, so it’s not uncommon for your vet to start treatment before any positive ID.

These days, new drugs, anti-parasitic shampoos, dips and spot-on treatments usually mean quicker response times, but multiple treatments taking up to six months are often necessary. As with all diseases, the quicker you visit your vet, the more likely mange can be dealt with effectively.

 


Aspen Valley Collection Box

Posted on February 16, 2013 at 5:50 AM

To all our valued customers of Aspen Valley Kennels and suppoters of Homeless Hounds we say a huge thank you for raising £58.10 via donation box collections.

Congratulations

Posted on November 22, 2012 at 5:15 PM

A huge congratulations to all the volunteers and trustees at Homeless Hounds for receiving charitable status. Keep up the fantsatic work. You are doing a tremendous job.From all at Aspen Valley Kennels. xxx:)

Roan's News (AKA Lenny)

Posted on November 13, 2012 at 11:55 AM

Hi - we couldn't resist sending you these "Thank you and goodbye" photos of Lenny. He was waiting for his ball throwing down the hill - he loves balls & he was just breaking in a new one after his last one vanished down the river yesterday!Never did lose his dew claws - at the last minute the vet decided they were better just clipped as needed. He's probably the best behaved dog we've ever had & we still can't believe anyone could just let him go! He's doing great & in a home for life now, anyway & very happy and settled.

Barbara


Message From Catherine

Posted on September 14, 2012 at 6:00 PM

Hi Just thought I'd let you know how George (formerly Branson), he's doing great had him a year now and he is the best dog i have ever had, so happy i got him from ossy had no major problems and well worth the week wait he's massive now and has been chipped. Thank you again for such a great dog ") x

Roan's 1st day

Posted on August 11, 2012 at 8:20 AM

Lenny's first morning here - been out with one of my sons & been swimming & fetching sticks & had a great time. Less impressed with me though, I just took him for his injections & the kennel cough spray up his nose & his dew claws trimmed! Everybody he's met loves him & he loves everybody back - doesn't fight and likes kids, too - the dream dog!

Lenny/Roan is off to the vet for his injections tomorrow - he ignores the cats, seems to love everybody & he's been swimming and playing in the field already - comes back when we call him & we've witnessed the 'smile' - it's WELL impressive!!

Thanks a lot

Barbara



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